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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 68-71

Evaluation of the chemical and microbial quality of bottled water distributed during disasters


1 Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Health Faculty, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2 Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Health Faculty Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Hassan Hashemi
Lecturer, Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Health Faculty, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2347-9019.128114

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Aims: Since during natural disaster all infrastructures such as water distribution system are damaged, access to safe drinking water is one of the first priorities following a disaster. The main aim of this study was to determine the chemical and microbial quality of bottled water distributed during disaster and compare them with National Iranian Standards. Materials and Methods: The microbial parameters (total coliform, fecal coliform) and chemical parameters (total hardness, calcium, magnesium, nitrate, nitrite, iron and fluoride) were determined according to standard methods. Results: The results showed that there were no microbial contaminations in any of the six different brands of mineral water. The total coliform and fecal coliform in all of the samples was not found. However, for the chemical composition, the concentration of the studied compounds was lower than standard. The amount of fluoride in all water samples was lower than 0.5 ppm. The hardness of six brands of bottled water in Fars was relatively high (121-180) and there was no iron in any of the samples. Conclusions: According to the results, though there was no microbial and chemical contamination in the studied bottled waters, the amount of fluoride in all water samples was lower than 0.5 ppm that may cause dental caries. Chemical quantities measured in this study were different from the amount listed on the label on bottled water. Therefore, the administrators need more control on labeling bottled water.


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